Tag : japanese ramen

Tsuta – World’s First Michelin-Starred Japanese Ramen in Singapore

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Tsuta

Opened in 2012 by Chef Yuki Onishi, it was the first ever Japanese ramen shop to attain a Michelin star. It is also listed in Singapore Michelin Bib Gourmand 2017. Sounds impressive? That’s what we thought.

Although this Michelin-starred eatery is situated at the entrance of Pacific plaza, it is easy to miss this cozy establishment that only seats 18 people. As soon as you walk in, you can smell the fragrant scent of truffle wafting through the eatery.

Before you are seated, you are required to place your order at the kiosk located at the entrance of the restaurant. This made the process incredibly fuss-free. You would not have to worry about the waiter getting your orders mixed up here.

As for the wait, it has died down from the two hour queue when they first opened their Singapore outlet in 2016. It was only a 20 minutes wait, which was pretty decent considering the fact that we went on Christmas day.

The Food

Ajitama Shoyu Soba

I had the Ajitama Shoyu Soba while my friend decided on the Ajitama Shio Soba. Both dishes came with pork slices, flavoured egg, bamboo shoots, leeks and truffle. The only differences are the green olives pureed in truffle oil in the Ajitama Shio Soba and the soup base. The Shio Soba is made with a chicken-seafood broth, rock salt, red wine and rosemary while Tsuta’s signature Shoyu Soba, is made with dashi brewed from a combination of chicken, clams and three types of soy sauces. One of the three soy sauces is apparently custom-blended by an artisanal soy sauce producer in Japan’s Wakayama prefecture from soya beans that have been aged for two years.

Our Verdict

The egg was done to perfection, soft and smooth with a runny yolk. For me that was the highlight of the meal. The noodles were pretty good too and it was not overcooked or underdone. While most people dislike noodles that are overdone, a pet peeve of mine is noodles that are too al dente.

I have to admit, adding truffle oil to the broth makes the ramen pretty unique. But it fell short of our expectations. Maybe we were too accustomed to rich tonkotsu broth, as pointed out by several reviewers, or maybe we had hyped it up too much in our minds. We both felt that we would enjoy it more if it was a little richer. My friend also mentioned that he did not particularly enjoy the olives in the Shio broth so I definitely recommend trying the Shoyu Soba or Miso Soba instead if you are not very adventurous.

Is The Juice Worth The Squeeze?

Prices start from $15 for a bowl of ramen each and considering the fact that 80 percent of the ingredients are imported from Japan, we think that the price is rather decent. You are paying for premium quality ingredients and it is situated in the heart of Orchard afterall.

Would we go back again? Probably not anytime soon. Unless we have a sudden craving for ramen and we are too lazy to trek to another location after a shopping day out in Orchard. But we definitely recommend giving it a try at least once and you can tell all your friends that you have had a michelin-starred meal before!

Where?

Tsuta
Pacific Plaza
9 Scotts Road, #01-01, 228210
Tel: (+65) 6734 4886
Opening Hours: 11am- 9.30pm daily

 

*The Mbassadors paid for their own meal (ouch!) unless otherwise stated.

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A Bowl of Kanagawa Goodness

Pei Xia Ang

The Weekly Glutton (13/11-20/11)

The Weekly Glutton features dining delights that have impressed us one way or another (or not) and are places we highly recommend you patronize.

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Machida Shoten

Almost a week after our last trip to Japan Food Town, M and I found ourselves back again. But how can you blame us, the food there is just so satisfying! This week, we paid a visit to Machida Shoten, a ramen place from the Kanagawa Prefecture.

Machida Shoten close up of ramen

Shoyu Tonkatsu Cha-Shu Ramen, $18++

At Machida Shoten, customers are allowed to be as picky as they want.

Called lekei, Machida Shoten offers a unique concept of allowing customers to personalise their bowl of ramen to suit their preferences. One can expect to choose from light to Japan taste to strong flavour for their soup, and noodle textures ranging from soft, regular and hard.

Machida Shoten springy noodles

Noodles

The noodles were well-made, carrying a springy texture. They were not overly starchy, and were a good compliment to the rich broth.

Machida Shoten broth

Broth

One of the things I love here is the fact that customers can be as picky as they want. Can’t decide between a pork-based broth or soya sauced based one? Why not both!

Initially, I took tentative sips of the soup, but eventually got used to the salty pork- flavoured soup. As a testament to how full-bodied the flavour of the soup was, we realised that we had no need for the condiments by the side, as each sip carried a fresh new burst of flavours.

However, something that M realised mid-meal was that her soup was more oily than mine. She had the “light” flavoured soup, while I went for the Japan taste option. We figured that this may be because the oil from the char-shu mixed better with a richer broth, so my soup was less oily.

Machida Shoten char siew

Char-Shu

By the side of the bowl sits 5 tantalisingly thick-cut slices of char-shu. Alas, don’t let size fool you though. Despite the thickness of the meat, the char-shu slices were tender and soft, with good meat to fat ratio.

My first impression of the char-shu was how incredibly break-in-your-mouth soft it was, followed by awe when the fat that melted in my mouth. If there was a heaven, let it be filled with this char-shu for all of eternity.

Call me impressionable, but never have I had as many char-shu slices that were of such great quality. Usual ramen places serve at most 4 thin slices of char-shu, or 2 thick slices. But here you go, 5 thick, generous cuts of char-shu, sitting in full decadence at the side of your bowl, waiting for you to sink your teeth into them.

Machida Shoten great ramen great price

Conclusion

Different ramen places have different specialties, and if you particularly fancy char-shu, then you should give this place a visit!

Machida Shoten the store

Machida Shoten
Japan Food Town
Wisma Atria
#04-40 Wistma Atria, ISETAN Orchard
435 Orchard Road
Singapore 238877
Tel: (+65)6262 3214
Opening Hours: 11.30am-11pm on weekdays, 11am-11pm on weekends

 

*The Mbassadors paid for their own meal (ouch!) unless otherwise stated.

Don’t forget to head over to our socials HERE and give us a warm and friendly LIKE to see more of our content! Thanks for the support!

Ramen Rave (Ramen Revolution 2017)

Pei Xia Ang

Being at the Ramen Revolution festival is no easy feat. One has to be willing to spend money on bowls after bowls of ramen, try out new flavours, but most importantly, be able to stomach more than 1 bowl of ramen.

Over the weekend, I grabbed a fellow ramen-lover along to try out different bowls of ramen. Afterwards, we were so stuffed we were barely able walk. But we agreed that it was a worthy event, and here are some of the ramen that made it so:

1. Ramen Atelier

The first booth that caught our attention was Ramen Atelier’s French inspired ramen.

Ramen Revolution Duck Confit Ramen

Duck Confit Ramen

My personal favourite. Due to the complexity and uniqueness of flavor. This dish is served dry ramen style, and the noodles were drizzled with a tangy citrus-soy dressing. This saltiness works well with the shredded duck confit, and the taste is balanced out by the sweetness of the onsen egg and crunchy purple cabbage.

A trick to eating this is to mix well, and then to have a bit of every ingredient as you scoop it to up to have all the flavors mashing up in your mouth.

Ramen Revolution Squid Ink Ramen

Squid Ink Miso Ramen

Another unique ramen flavor from Ramen Atelier, the squid ink ramen fascinates and intrigues us. As you can tell from its name, the key ingredient to the broth of this dish is squid ink. We loved how the squid ink miso was rich in flavor and extremely well-seasoned, yet not too thick and “jelat” after some time. The noodles are softer and more bland as compared to the former, but still maintained its texture and chewiness.

Ramen Revolution Menya Masaume

2. Menya Masamune

A crowd magnet, this stall had people making a beeline to the queue since the event started. Why? Their ramen has been crowned the grand champion at two separate ramen contests in New York City, that’s why! Naturally, as two warm-blooded Singaporean foodies, we gravitated towards the queue too.

After waiting in line for about 15 minutes (we were quite lucky actually), we finally got a bowl of Masamune Shio.

Ramen Revolution Masamune Shio

At first look, the ramen appeared to be rather greasy, but to our surprise, it had a light flavor that was not too heavy on the tastebuds. In fact, we really enjoyed the broth. Kudos to the leek that was thrown in, giving its taste more depth and complexity. They also practice something unorthodox – barbecuing the charshu slices, and using them to marinate the soup. This probably gave the broth its oily sheen and unparalleled taste, while getting a soft, tender charshu. Pure genius!

Toss in chewy noodles, and gooey lava egg, I’d gladly pay $20 for a bowl of this any day.

Ramen Revolution Lobster King Ramen

3. Ramen Keisuke Lobster King

Not doing too bad in the other corner is the Lobster King Ramen. At this point, the both of us were pretty full and decided that if this was going to be our last bowl of ramen, it had to be a bowl of lobster ramen.

The noodles were a tad too soft (“lao hong”) and starchy for my liking, but it was the broth that sealed the deal for me.

Brewed for over 5 hours, the stock consists of a special blend of herbs and vegetables, giving it its distinct aroma and sweetness. The rich broth may prove to be too much after some time, but this problem is easily fixed with the vegetables, black fungus, leek, and bamboo shoot added. (uh huh, all these in a bowl of ramen worth $10!!) These ingredients helped add a crunch to soup, giving every mouthful a fresh burst of flavor. Honestly, the soup was so satisfying that we found ourselves slurping it and ignoring the noodles eventually.

Ramen Revolution staff at work

Overall, despite the smaller portions, the ramen served were worth the $10, some even more so.

However something that irked me was the excessive use of disposable bowls and cutlery. Hopefully, should this be an annual event, the organizers will consider the use of recycling bins.

Aside from that, I eagerly anticipate the next Ramen Revolution! Here’s to ramen!

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