Tag : Noodles

An Honest Bowl of Prawn Mee

Pei Xia Ang

The Weekly Glutton (16/10-23/10)

The Weekly Glutton features dining delights that have impressed us one way or another (or not) and are places we highly recommend you patronize.

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Old Hokkien Prawn Noodle bowl

Traditional Prawn Noodle

I suppose each one of us have different preferences when it comes to our favorite food. Some of us prefer the traditional taste, while others prefer the more modern adaptation. I for one favor the traditional, no-frills dishes, and the Old Hokkien Prawn Noodle is one of such places.

Here, they serve simple, fuss-free servings of prawn mee, each bowl capturing the essence of a honest bowl of prawn noodles.

Old Hokkien Prawn Noodle signboard

The menu at Old Hokkien Prawn Noodle was simple. Just 4 options of prawn mee to choose from: traditional, with pork ribs, with pigs tail, or with jumbo prawns. Most options allow for customers to choose the size of the portions that they want, and a soup or dry version.

We decided to go with the traditional prawn mee, but ordered a bowl of dry mee and soup mee for comparison.

Old Hokkien Prawn Noodle the soup

The soup

When I first tasted the soup, I loved the rich, authentic taste of the prawn broth. This was unlike other places that you can taste the addition of MSG to the soup.

Admittedly, the addition of MSG gives the soup a “kick” that was a bit lacking here, but as I am all for sticking to authentic flavours, you won’t hear any complains from me here.

To top it off, the broth was commendably not too salty or oily, especially taking into account the fact that we ordered yellow noodles.

Old Hokkien Prawn Noodle gif

The noodles

The noodles were of just the right texture— not too soft or overly chewy. In fact, they even carried a certain springiness that we really enjoyed.

However, my favourite kind of prawn mee is the dry version, as each bite is always packed with so much flavour. Tossed in chilli sauce and perfectly al dente, the noodles were gone in a blink.

Old Hokkien Prawn Noodle prawn close up

The prawns

Arguably the star of the dish, (I mean it’s called PRAWN MEE for a reason) the prawns here were succulent and fresh. We ordered the regular ones, and each prawn was already so plump and meaty.

Imagine the JUMBO PRAWNS!!!

Plus, the prawns here come peeled for you so you don’t have to struggle with it!

Old Hokkien Prawn Noodle pork

The pork

Thinly sliced and carrying just the right amount of fat, the pork strips go really well with the prawn mee. They add texture to the bowl of noodles.

Old Hokkien Prawn Noodle garnish

The garnish

Having garnishing adds a special flavour to each bowl of prawn mee. It defines a stall’s signature taste. The garnishing here was unpretentious— shallots, lard, and other ingredients. The shallots and lard, coupled with the crunchy beansprouts and kang kong made every bite of noodles a delight. Not to forget the sinful chunks of lards mixed with chilli, heightening  the umami sensation.

Old Hokkien Prawn Noodle wholesome meal

Conclusion

Even if you prefer the modern adaptation of prawn mee to the traditional, do still drop by Old Hokkien Prawn Noodle for an honest bowl of noodles. Greeted with warm smiles and a yummy bowl of noodles, one is sure to leave satisfied.

Old Hokkien Prawn Noodle store front

Old Hokkien Prawn Noodle
Address: 517 Geylang Rd
Singapore 389473
Tel: +65 9663 3633
Opening Hours: Tuesdays- Sundays 9am-3am

Ramen Rave (Ramen Revolution 2017)

Pei Xia Ang

Being at the Ramen Revolution festival is no easy feat. One has to be willing to spend money on bowls after bowls of ramen, try out new flavours, but most importantly, be able to stomach more than 1 bowl of ramen.

Over the weekend, I grabbed a fellow ramen-lover along to try out different bowls of ramen. Afterwards, we were so stuffed we were barely able walk. But we agreed that it was a worthy event, and here are some of the ramen that made it so:

1. Ramen Atelier

The first booth that caught our attention was Ramen Atelier’s French inspired ramen.

Ramen Revolution Duck Confit Ramen

Duck Confit Ramen

My personal favourite. Due to the complexity and uniqueness of flavor. This dish is served dry ramen style, and the noodles were drizzled with a tangy citrus-soy dressing. This saltiness works well with the shredded duck confit, and the taste is balanced out by the sweetness of the onsen egg and crunchy purple cabbage.

A trick to eating this is to mix well, and then to have a bit of every ingredient as you scoop it to up to have all the flavors mashing up in your mouth.

Ramen Revolution Squid Ink Ramen

Squid Ink Miso Ramen

Another unique ramen flavor from Ramen Atelier, the squid ink ramen fascinates and intrigues us. As you can tell from its name, the key ingredient to the broth of this dish is squid ink. We loved how the squid ink miso was rich in flavor and extremely well-seasoned, yet not too thick and “jelat” after some time. The noodles are softer and more bland as compared to the former, but still maintained its texture and chewiness.

Ramen Revolution Menya Masaume

2. Menya Masamune

A crowd magnet, this stall had people making a beeline to the queue since the event started. Why? Their ramen has been crowned the grand champion at two separate ramen contests in New York City, that’s why! Naturally, as two warm-blooded Singaporean foodies, we gravitated towards the queue too.

After waiting in line for about 15 minutes (we were quite lucky actually), we finally got a bowl of Masamune Shio.

Ramen Revolution Masamune Shio

At first look, the ramen appeared to be rather greasy, but to our surprise, it had a light flavor that was not too heavy on the tastebuds. In fact, we really enjoyed the broth. Kudos to the leek that was thrown in, giving its taste more depth and complexity. They also practice something unorthodox – barbecuing the charshu slices, and using them to marinate the soup. This probably gave the broth its oily sheen and unparalleled taste, while getting a soft, tender charshu. Pure genius!

Toss in chewy noodles, and gooey lava egg, I’d gladly pay $20 for a bowl of this any day.

Ramen Revolution Lobster King Ramen

3. Ramen Keisuke Lobster King

Not doing too bad in the other corner is the Lobster King Ramen. At this point, the both of us were pretty full and decided that if this was going to be our last bowl of ramen, it had to be a bowl of lobster ramen.

The noodles were a tad too soft (“lao hong”) and starchy for my liking, but it was the broth that sealed the deal for me.

Brewed for over 5 hours, the stock consists of a special blend of herbs and vegetables, giving it its distinct aroma and sweetness. The rich broth may prove to be too much after some time, but this problem is easily fixed with the vegetables, black fungus, leek, and bamboo shoot added. (uh huh, all these in a bowl of ramen worth $10!!) These ingredients helped add a crunch to soup, giving every mouthful a fresh burst of flavor. Honestly, the soup was so satisfying that we found ourselves slurping it and ignoring the noodles eventually.

Ramen Revolution staff at work

Overall, despite the smaller portions, the ramen served were worth the $10, some even more so.

However something that irked me was the excessive use of disposable bowls and cutlery. Hopefully, should this be an annual event, the organizers will consider the use of recycling bins.

Aside from that, I eagerly anticipate the next Ramen Revolution! Here’s to ramen!

1 Star Michelin Feature – Hill Street Tai Hwa Pork Noodles

admin

The Weekly Glutton (17/6 – 23/7)

The Weekly Glutton features dining delights that have impressed us one way or another (or not) and are places we highly recommend you patronize.

Don’t forget to subscribe if you want to be updated weekly! Or you could bookmark this page or even do BOTH!

Hill Street Tai Hwa Pork Noodles

Hill Street Tai Hwa Pork Noodles

Tucked along Crawford Lane in an unassuming corner is one Michelin star stall, Hill Street Tai Hwa Pork Noodles. However, despite the Michelin star accolade, they’re still a humble bunch with a smile for every customer.

After joining the queue at about late 5pm with about 12 customers ahead of me, I didn’t think I’d only be getting my food at 7pm! The long waiting time wasn’t because of the crowd, but rather the time it took for the chefs to churn out a bowl of noodles.

Being Singaporean and all, queuing is what we do best. Just ensure that your phone has heaps of battery before you commit yourself to the queue.

Hill Street Tai Hwa Pork Noodles meat and noodles

The Verdict

The noodles come in 3 different tiered pricing – $6 / $8 / $10. A wee bit more expensive than other Bak Chor Mees out there but hey, they’ve got a Michelin Star! 

The “Mee Kia” was perfectly cooked with a satisfying semi aldente texture. This is something not many Bak Chor Mee stalls can achieve. Paired with the perfect combination of black vinegar, soy sauce and chili, its enticing aromas filled my nostrils as I patiently waited in line. Slurps.

I would have preferred “Mee Pok” or Flat egg noodle but that sold out by the time it was my turn to order.

The ingredients like minced pork, meatballs, pork liver and crispy sole fish (uncommon in normal stalls) were fresh and a great joy to gobble down. The liver was the ingredient that particularly impressed us with its tender texture and rich flavors. Good Job Tai Hwa!

The soup felt a little MSG heavy but tasty nonetheless.

In our view, this is one of the best Bak Chor Mee stalls we have ever tried in Singapore.

Hill Street Tai Hwa Pork Noodles
Address: 466 Crawford Lane, Tai Hwa Eating House , #01-12
Singapore 190465
Tel: +65 6292 7477
Opening Hours: 9:30am – 9:00pm (Closed on 1st and 3rd Mondays of the month)

 

*The Mbassadors paid for their own meal (ouch!) unless otherwise stated.

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